Women, Children, and Industrialization in the Early Republic: Evidence from the Manufacturing Censuses

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Women, Children, and Industrialization in the Early Republic: Evidence from the Manufacturing Censuses

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Title: Women, Children, and Industrialization in the Early Republic: Evidence from the Manufacturing Censuses
Author: Goldin, Claudia; Sokoloff, Kenneth

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Goldin, Claudia and Kenneth Sokoloff. 1982. Women, children, and industrialization in the early republic: Evidence from the manufacturing censuses. Journal of Economic History 42(4): 741-774.
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Abstract: Manufacturing firm data for 1820 to 1850 are employed to investigate the role of women and children in the industrialization of the American Northeast. The principal findings include: (1) Women and children composed a major share of the entire manufacturing labor force; (2) their employment was closely associated with production processes used by large establishments, both mechanized and non-mechanized; (3) the wage of females (and boys) increased relative to that of men with industrial development; and (4) female labor force participation in industrial counties was substantial. These findings bear on the nature of technical change during early industrialization and why American industrial development was initially concentrated in the Northeast.
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3386/w0795
Other Sources: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2121107
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:2664292

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7078]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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