America's Graduation from High School: The Evolution and Spread of Secondary Schooling in the Twentieth Century

DSpace/Manakin Repository

America's Graduation from High School: The Evolution and Spread of Secondary Schooling in the Twentieth Century

Citable link to this page

. . . . . .

Title: America's Graduation from High School: The Evolution and Spread of Secondary Schooling in the Twentieth Century
Author: Goldin, Claudia
Citation: Goldin, Claudia. 1998. America's graduation from high school: The evolution and spread of secondary schooling in the twentieth century. Journal of Economic History 58(2): 345-374.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Secondary-school enrollment and graduation rates increased spectacularly in much of the United States from 1910 to 1940; the advance was particularly rapid from 1920 to 1935 in the nonsouthern states. This increase was uniquely American; no other nation underwent an equivalent change for several decades. States that rapidly expanded their high school enrollments early in the period had greater wealth, more homogeneity of wealth, and less manufacturing activity than others. Factors prompting the expansion include the substantial returns to education early in the century and a responsive "state." This work is based on a newly constructed state-level data set.
Published Version: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2566738
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:2664307

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7501]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters