What Can We Learn about Neighborhood Effects from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment?

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What Can We Learn about Neighborhood Effects from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment?

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Title: What Can We Learn about Neighborhood Effects from the Moving to Opportunity Experiment?
Author: Kling, Jeffrey R.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Ludwig, Jens; Sanbonmatsu, Lisa; Liebman, Jeffrey B.; Duncan, Greg J.; Katz, Lawrence

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Citation: Ludwig, Jens, Jeffrey B. Liebman, Jeffrey R. Kling, Greg J. Duncan, Lawrence F. Katz, Ronald C. Kessler, and Lisa Sanbonmatsu. 2008. What can we learn about neighborhood effects from the moving to opportunity experiment? American Journal of Sociology 114(1): 144-188.
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Abstract: Experimental estimates from Moving to Opportunity (MTO) show no significant impacts of moves to lower‐poverty neighborhoods on adult economic self‐sufficiency four to seven years after random assignment. The authors disagree with Clampet‐Lundquist and Massey's claim that MTO was a weak intervention and therefore uninformative about neighborhood effects. MTO produced large changes in neighborhood environments that improved adult mental health and many outcomes for young females. Clampet‐Lundquist and Massey's claim that MTO experimental estimates are plagued by selection bias is erroneous. Their new nonexperimental estimates are uninformative because they add back the selection problems that MTO's experimental design was intended to overcome.
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/588741
Other Sources: http://www.hks.harvard.edu/jeffreyliebman/Ludwig%20et%20al.pdf
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:2766959

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7175]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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