Excimer Laser Processing of Novel Materials for Optoelectronic and Spintronic Applications

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Excimer Laser Processing of Novel Materials for Optoelectronic and Spintronic Applications

Citable link to this page

. . . . . .

Title: Excimer Laser Processing of Novel Materials for Optoelectronic and Spintronic Applications
Author: Williams, James S.; Tabbal, Malek; Christidis, Theodore C.; Madi, Charbel; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Aziz, Michael

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Tabbal, Malek, Michael J. Aziz, Charbel Madi, Supakit Charnvanichborikarn, James S. Williams, and Theodore C. Christidis. 2007. Excimer laser processing of novel materials for optoelectronic and spintronic applications. Proceedings of SPIE 6458: 645803.
Access Status: At the direction of the depositing author this work is not currently accessible through DASH.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: The interaction of the highly energetic pulsed excimer laser beam with a target material induces non-equilibrium physico-chemical processes which could be harnessed to synthesize a variety of novel and technologically attractive materials that are difficult to grow using more conventional thin film deposition techniques. In this paper, recent advances on two excimer laser based techniques that we have used in the processing of thin films and surfaces will be presented. First, we demonstrate the synthesis, by Pulsed Laser Melting (PLM), of silicon supersaturated with sulfur at concentrations several orders of magnitude greater than the solubility limit of silicon alloys, with strong sub-bandgap optical absorption. This material has potential applications in the fabrication of Si-based opto-electronic devices. Second, the capability of Remote Plasma Pulsed Laser Deposition (RP-PLD) in synthesizing the meta-stable half-metallic CrO2 compound that is of great interest in the field of spintronics was assessed. Infra-Red spectroscopy and Magnetic Force Microscopy indicate that the use of the remote plasma is beneficial to the formation of the CrO2 phase, at a deposition pressure of 30 mTorr and for deposition temperature below 350 °C. Atomic Force Microscopy and Magnetic Force Microscopy studies respectively show that films containing the CrO2 phase have significantly different surface topography and magnetic characteristics from those in which the Cr2O3 phase is dominant.
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.716788
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:2795437

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7106]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters