Understanding the Hydraulics of Porous Pipes: Tradeoffs Between Water Uptake and Root Length Utilization

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Understanding the Hydraulics of Porous Pipes: Tradeoffs Between Water Uptake and Root Length Utilization

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Title: Understanding the Hydraulics of Porous Pipes: Tradeoffs Between Water Uptake and Root Length Utilization
Author: Thompson, Matthew; Zwieniecki, Maciej; Holbrook, Noel

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Citation: Zwieniecki, Maciej A., Matthew V. Thompson, and N. Michele Holbrook. 2002. Understanding the hydraulics of porous pipes: Tradeoffs between water uptake and root length utilization. Journal of Plant Growth Regulation 21(4): 315-323.
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Abstract: The water uptake region in roots is several hundred times longer than the root diameter. The distributed nature of the uptake zone requires that the hydraulic design of roots be understood by analogy to flow through a "porous pipe." Here we present results of an analytical and experimental investigation that allowed an in-depth analysis of root hydraulic properties. Measurements on nodal maize roots confirm the nonlinear distribution of water uptake predicted by the porous pipe model. The major design parameter governing the distribution of water uptake along a porous pipe is the ratio between its axial and radial hydraulic resistance. However, total flow is proportional to the pipe's overall resistance. These results suggest the existence of a tradeoff between the effective utilization of root length and the total capacity for water uptake.
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00344-003-0008-9
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:3047941

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7588]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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