Why the Brain Talks to Itself: Sources of Error in Emotional Prediction

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Why the Brain Talks to Itself: Sources of Error in Emotional Prediction

Citable link to this page

. . . . . .

Title: Why the Brain Talks to Itself: Sources of Error in Emotional Prediction
Author: Gilbert, Daniel; Wilson, Timothy D.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Gilbert, D. T., and T. D. Wilson. 2009. Why the brain talks to itself: Sources of error in emotional prediction. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B-Biological Sciences 364, no. 1521: 1335-1341.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: People typically choose pleasure over pain. But how do they know which of these their choices will entail? The brain generates mental simulations (previews) of future events, which produce affective reactions (premotions), which are then used as a basis for forecasts (predictions) about the future event's emotional consequences. Research shows that this process leads to systematic errors of prediction. We review evidence indicating that these errors can be traced to five sources.
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2008.0305
Other Sources: http://www.wjh.harvard.edu/~dtg/gilbert.htm
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:3110936

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • FAS Scholarly Articles [6466]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters