The Surprising Power of Neighborly Advice

DSpace/Manakin Repository

The Surprising Power of Neighborly Advice

Citable link to this page

. . . . . .

Title: The Surprising Power of Neighborly Advice
Author: Gilbert, Daniel; Killingsworth, Matthew; Wilson, Timothy D.; Eyre, Rebecca N.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Gilbert, Daniel T., Matthew A. Killingsworth, Rebecca. N. Eyre, and Timothy D. Wilson. 2009. The surprising power of neighborly advice. Science 323, no. 5921: 1617-1619.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Two experiments revealed that (i) people can more accurately predict their affective reactions to a future event when they know how a neighbor in their social network reacted to the event than when they know about the event itself and (ii) people do not believe this. Undergraduates made more accurate predictions about their affective reactions to a 5-minute speed date (n = 25) and to a peer evaluation (n = 88) when they knew only how another undergraduate had reacted to these events than when they had information about the events themselves. Both participants and independent judges mistakenly believed that predictions based on information about the event would be more accurate than predictions based on information about how another person had reacted to it.
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1166632
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:3110937

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • FAS Scholarly Articles [6463]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters