Paleobiology of Distinctive Benthic Microfossils from the Upper Proterozoic Limestone-Dolomite "Series," Central East Greenland

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Paleobiology of Distinctive Benthic Microfossils from the Upper Proterozoic Limestone-Dolomite "Series," Central East Greenland

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dc.contributor.author Knoll, Andrew
dc.contributor.author Swett, Keene
dc.contributor.author Golubic, Stjepko
dc.contributor.author Greene, Julian W.
dc.date.accessioned 2009-07-09T13:28:49Z
dc.date.issued 1987
dc.identifier.citation Green, Julian W., Andrew H. Knoll, Stjepko Golubic, and Keene Swett. 1987. Paleobiology of distinctive benthic microfossils from the Upper Proterozoic Limestone-Dolomite "Series," central East Greenland. American Journal of Botany 74, no. 6: 928-940. en
dc.identifier.issn 0002-9122 en
dc.identifier.uri http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:3157879
dc.description.abstract Populations of <i>Polybessurus bipartitus</i> Fairchild ex Green et al., a large and morphologically distinctive microfossil, occur in silicified carbonates of the Upper Proterozoic (700-800 Ma) Limestone-Dolomite "Series," central East Greenland. Large populations of well-preserved individuals permit reconstruction of <i>P. bipartitus</i> as a coccoidal unicell that "jetted" upward from the sediment surface by the highly unidirectional secretion of extracellular mucopolysaccharide envelopes. Reproduction by baeocyte formation is inferred on the basis of clustered envelope stalks produced by small cells. Sedimentological evidence indicates that <i>P. bipartitus</i> formed surficial crusts locally within a shallow peritidal carbonate platform. Among living microorganisms a close morphological, reproductive, and behavioral counterpart to <i>Polybessurus</i> is provided by populations of an as yet undescribed cyanobacterium found in coastal Bahamian environments similar to those in which the Proterozoic fossils occur. In general morphology and "jetting" behavior, this population resembles species of the genus <i>Cyanostylon</i> Geitler (1925), but reproduces via baeocyte formation. <i>Polybessurus</i> is but one of the more than two dozen taxa in the richly fossiliferous biota of the Limestone-Dolomite "Series." This distinctive population, along with co-occuring filamentous cyanobacteria and other microfossils, contribute to an increasingly refined picture of ecological heterogeneity in late Proterozoic oceans. en
dc.description.sponsorship Organismic and Evolutionary Biology en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Botanical Society of America en
dc.relation.isversionof http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/2443874 en
dash.license META_ONLY
dc.title Paleobiology of Distinctive Benthic Microfossils from the Upper Proterozoic Limestone-Dolomite "Series," Central East Greenland en
dc.relation.journal American Journal of Botany en
dash.depositing.author Knoll, Andrew
dash.embargo.until 10000-01-01

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7374]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University

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