Psychosocial Stress and the Duration of Cocaine Use in Non-treatment Seeking Individuals with Cocaine Dependence

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Psychosocial Stress and the Duration of Cocaine Use in Non-treatment Seeking Individuals with Cocaine Dependence

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Title: Psychosocial Stress and the Duration of Cocaine Use in Non-treatment Seeking Individuals with Cocaine Dependence
Author: Lukas, Scott; Elman, Igor; Karlsgodt, Katherine H.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Karlsgodt, Katherine H., Scott E. Lukas, and Igor Elman. 2003. Psychosocial stress and the duration of cocaine use in non-treatment seeking individuals with cocaine dependence. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 29(3): 539-551.
Access Status: At the direction of the depositing author this work is not currently accessible through DASH.
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Abstract: The aim of this study was to explore a potential link between psychosocial stress and cocaine dependence among 36 non-treatment-seeking individuals enrolled in a brain imaging protocol. Stress was assessed using computerized multidimensional instruments, including the Profile of Mood States (POMS) and Speilberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Additional clinical assessments employed were the Addiction Severity Index and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). Based on the median POMS' tension-anxiety scale score the entire sample was divided into two groups, those with high and low levels of stress. The two groups (n = 16 and 20) were similar in terms of age, gender distribution, and severity of addiction. Compared with the low stress group, high-stress individuals displayed significantly longer duration of cocaine use, greater POMS, STAI-state, STAI-Trait, and HRSD scores. Our results replicate those of prior reports implicating stress in the course of cocaine dependence and extend these prior findings by 1) including a new subject population of non-treatment-seekers and 2) by suggesting that the stress-cocaine link may be generalizable to psychosocial stress and negative affective states defined by POMS, STAI, and HRSD scores.
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1081/ADA-120023457
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:3203275

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7374]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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