Visual Short-Term Memory Benefit for Objects on Different 3-D Surfaces

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Visual Short-Term Memory Benefit for Objects on Different 3-D Surfaces

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Title: Visual Short-Term Memory Benefit for Objects on Different 3-D Surfaces
Author: Nakayama, Ken; Xu, Yaoda

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Xu, Yaoda, and Ken Nakayama. 2007. Visual short-term memory benefit for objects on different 3-D surfaces. Journal of Experimental Psychology General 136, no. 4: 653-662.
Access Status: At the direction of the depositing author this work is not currently accessible through DASH.
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Abstract: Visual short-term memory (VSTM) plays an important role in visual cognition. Although objects are located on different 3-dimensional (3-D) surfaces in the real world, how VSTM capacity may be influenced by the presence of multiple 3-D surfaces has never been examined. By manipulating binocular disparities of visual displays, the authors found that more colored objects could be held in VSTM when they were placed on 2 rather than on I planar 3-D surfaces. This between-surface benefit in VSTM was present only when binding of objects' colors to their 3-D locations was required (i.e., when observers needed to remember which color appeared where). When binding was not required, no between-surface benefit in VSTM was observed. This benefit in VSTM could not be attributed to the number of spatial locations attended within a given surface. It was not due to a general perceptual grouping effect either, because grouping by motion and grouping by different regions of the same surface did not yield the same benefit. This increment in capacity indicates that VSTM benefits from the placement of objects in a 3-D scene.
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0096-3445.136.4.653
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:3207708

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7106]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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