Women, Gender, and Utopia: The Death of Nature and the Historiography of Early Modern Science

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Women, Gender, and Utopia: The Death of Nature and the Historiography of Early Modern Science

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Title: Women, Gender, and Utopia: The Death of Nature and the Historiography of Early Modern Science
Author: Park, Katharine
Citation: Park, Katherine. 2006. Women, gender, and utopia: The Death of Nature and the historiography of early modern science. Isis 97, no 3: 487-495.
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Abstract: This essay reflects on the ambivalent reception of The Death of Nature among English-speaking historians of early modern science. It argues that, despite its importance, the book was mostly ignored or marginalized by these historians (as opposed to historians interested in feminist or environmental studies) for a variety of reasons. These included the special role played by the "Scientific Revolution" in the grand narrative that increasingly shaped the historiography of science beginning in the 1940s and the subsequent "hyperprofessionalism" of the discipline as a whole. The essay concludes by placing Carolyn Merchant's work in the context of feminist utopian writing of the late 1970s and calls for renewed attention to the history of the utopian genre as a resource for teachers and feminist scholars of the history of science.
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/508078
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:3209547

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7501]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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