Observation of Coherent Optical Information Storage in an Atomic Medium Using Halted Light Pulses

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Observation of Coherent Optical Information Storage in an Atomic Medium Using Halted Light Pulses

Citable link to this page

. . . . . .

Title: Observation of Coherent Optical Information Storage in an Atomic Medium Using Halted Light Pulses
Author: Liu, Chien; Dutton, Zachary; Behroozi, Cyrus H.; Hau, Lene Vestergaard

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Liu, Chien, Zachary Dutton, Cyrus H. Behroozi, and Lene Vestergaard Hau. 2001. Observation of coherent optical information storage in an atomic medium using halted light pulses. Nature 409(6819): 490-493.
Access Status: At the direction of the depositing author this work is not currently accessible through DASH.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Electromagnetically induced transparency(1-3) is a quantum interference effect that permits the propagation of light through an otherwise opaque atomic medium; a 'coupling' laser is used to create the interference necessary to allow the transmission of resonant pulses from a 'probe' laser. This technique has been used(4-6) to slow and spatially compress light pulses by seven orders of magnitude, resulting in their complete localization and containment within an atomic cloud(4). Here we use electromagnetically induced transparency to bring laser pulses to a complete stop in a magnetically trapped, cold cloud of sodium atoms. Within the spatially localized pulse region, the atoms are in a superposition state determined by the amplitudes and phases of the coupling and probe laser fields. Upon sudden turn-off of the coupling laser, the compressed probe pulse is effectively stopped; coherent information initially contained in the laser fields is 'frozen' in the atomic medium for up to 1 ms. The coupling laser is turned back on at a later time and the probe pulse is regenerated: the stored coherence is read out and transferred back into the radiation field. We present a theoretical model that reveals that the system is self-adjusting to minimize dissipative loss during the 'read' and 'write' operations. We anticipate applications of this phenomenon for quantum information processing.
Published Version: doi:10.1038/35054017
Other Sources: http://www.seas.harvard.edu/haulab/publications/pdf/Stopped_Light_2001.pdf
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:3636968

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • FAS Scholarly Articles [6466]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters