The Role of the Nucleus Accumbens and Rostral Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Anhedonia: Integration of Resting EEG, fMRI, and Volumetric Techniques

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The Role of the Nucleus Accumbens and Rostral Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Anhedonia: Integration of Resting EEG, fMRI, and Volumetric Techniques

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Title: The Role of the Nucleus Accumbens and Rostral Anterior Cingulate Cortex in Anhedonia: Integration of Resting EEG, fMRI, and Volumetric Techniques
Author: Wacker, Jan; Pizzagalli, Diego A; Dillon, Daniel G.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Wacker, Jan, Daniel G. Dillon, and Diego A. Pizzagalli. 2009. The role of the nucleus accumbens and rostral anterior cingulate cortex in anhedonia: Integration of resting EEG, fMRI, and volumetric techniques. Neuroimage 46, no. 1: 327-337.
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Abstract: Anhedonia, the reduced propensity to experience pleasure, is a promising endo-- phenotype and vulnerability factor for several psychiatric disorders, including depression and schizophrenia. In the present study, we used resting electroencephalography, functional magnetic resonance imaging, and volumetric analyses to probe putative associations between anhedonia and individual differences in key nodes of the brain's reward system in a non-clinical sample. We found that anhedonia, but not other symptoms of depression or anxiety, was correlated with reduced nucleus accumbens (NAcc) responses to rewards (gains in a monetary incentive delay task), reduced NAcc volume, and increased resting delta current density (i.e., decreased resting activity) in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), an area previously implicated in positive subjective experience. In addition, NAcc reward responses were inversely associated with rACC resting delta activity, supporting the hypothesis that delta might be lawfully related to activity within the brain's reward circuit. Taken together, these results help elucidate the neural basis of anhedonia and strengthen the argument for anhedonia as an endophenotype for depression.
Published Version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2009.01.058
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:3710399

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7078]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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