Transpacific Transport of Asian Anthropogenic Aerosols and its Impact on Surface Air Quality in the United States

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Transpacific Transport of Asian Anthropogenic Aerosols and its Impact on Surface Air Quality in the United States

Citable link to this page

. . . . . .

Title: Transpacific Transport of Asian Anthropogenic Aerosols and its Impact on Surface Air Quality in the United States
Author: Heald, Colette L.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Park, Rokjin J.; Alexander, Becky; Fairlie, T. Duncan; Yantosca, Robert M.; Chu, D. Allen

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Heald, Colette L., Daniel J. Jacob, Rokjin J. Park, Becky Alexander, T. Duncan Fairlie, Robert M. Yantosca, and D. Allen Chu. 2006. Transpacific transport of Asian anthropogenic aerosols and its impact on surface air quality in the United States. Journal of Geophysical Research 111: D14310.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: We use satellite (MODIS) observations of aerosol optical depths (AODs) over the North Pacific, together with surface aerosol measurements at a network of remote U.S. sites (IMPROVE), to improve understanding of the transpacific transport of Asian aerosol pollution and assess the ability of a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem CTM) to quantify Asian aerosol enhancements in U.S. surface air. The MODIS observations show the strongest transpacific transport occurring in spring at 40–55°N. This transport in the model takes place mainly in the lower free troposphere (900–700 hPa) because of scavenging during transport either in the boundary layer or during lifting to the upper troposphere. The preferential altitude of aerosol transpacific transport results in direct impact on the elevated terrain of the NW United States. Sulfate observations in the NW United States in spring 2001 show higher concentrations on the days of model-predicted maximum Asian influence (1.04 μg m−3) than seasonal mean values (0.69 μg m−3). No such Asian enhancements are observed for nitrate or for organic carbon (OC) aerosol. Distinct Asian sulfate episodes correlated with dust events are observed in the NW United States and simulated with the model. The mean Asian pollution enhancement in that region in spring is 0.16 μg m−3 with a 50% estimated uncertainty. This is higher than the estimated natural concentration of 0.09 μg m−3 presently used as objective for regulation of visibility in U.S. wilderness areas.
Published Version: doi:10.1029/2005JD006847
Other Sources: http://acmg.seas.harvard.edu/cvdj.html
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:3743793

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • FAS Scholarly Articles [6466]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters