Did Illegally Counted Overseas Absentee Ballots Decide the 2000 U.S. Presidential Election?

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Did Illegally Counted Overseas Absentee Ballots Decide the 2000 U.S. Presidential Election?

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Title: Did Illegally Counted Overseas Absentee Ballots Decide the 2000 U.S. Presidential Election?
Author: Imai, Kosuke; King, Gary

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Imai, Kosuke, and Gary King. 2004. Did illegally counted overseas absentee ballots decide the 2000 U.S. presidential election? Perspectives on Politics 2(3): 537-549.
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Abstract: Although not widely known until much later, Al Gore received 202 more votes than George W. Bush on election day in Florida. George W. Bush is president because he overcame his election day deficit with overseas absentee ballots that arrived and were counted after election day. In the final official tally, Bush received 537 more votes than Gore. These numbers are taken from the official results released by the Florida Secretary of State’s office and so do not reflect overvotes, undervotes, unsuccessful litigation, butterfly ballot problems, recounts that might have been allowed but were not, or any other hypothetical divergence between voter preferences and counted votes. After the election, the New York Times conducted a six-month investigation and found that 680 of the overseas absentee ballots were illegally counted, and almost no one has publicly disagreed with their assessment. In this article, we describe the statistical procedures we developed and implemented for the Times to ascertain whether disqualifying these 680 ballots would have changed the outcome of the election. These include adding formal Bayesian model averaging procedures to models of ecolog- ical inference. We present a variety of new empirical results that delineate the precise conditions under which Al Gore would have been elected president and offer new evidence of the striking effectiveness of the Republican effort to prevent local election officials from applying election law equally to all Florida citizens.
Published Version: doi:10.1017/S1537592704040332
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:3965113

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7587]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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