Design and Performance of Microlith Implemented Projectiles During the Middle and the Late Epipaleolithic of the Levant: Experimental and Archaeological Evidence

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Design and Performance of Microlith Implemented Projectiles During the Middle and the Late Epipaleolithic of the Levant: Experimental and Archaeological Evidence

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Title: Design and Performance of Microlith Implemented Projectiles During the Middle and the Late Epipaleolithic of the Levant: Experimental and Archaeological Evidence
Author: Yaroshevich, Alla; Kaufman, Daniel; Nuzhnyy, Dmitri; Bar-Yosef, Ofer; Weinstein-Evron, Mina

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Citation: Yaroshevich  Alla, Daniel Kaufman , Dnitri Nuzhnyy, Ofer Bar-Yosef, and Mina Weinstein-Evron. 2010. Design and performance of microlith implemented projectiles during the middle and the late Epipaleolithic of the Levant: Experimental and archaeological evidence. Journal of Archaeological Science 37(2): 368-388.
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Abstract: The study comprises an experimentally based investigation of interaction between temporal change in the morphology of microlithic tools and transformations in projectile technology during the Late Pleistocene in the Levant. Archery experiments with differently designed arrows fitted with various types of microliths representing subsequent Epipaleolithic cultures of the Levant allowed analyzing performance abilities of the arrows, identifying projectile damage types characteristic of particular hafting modes, detecting factors influencing the frequency of projectile damage and estimating the frequency of projectile damage expected to be found in archaeological samples. The data obtained through the experiments applied in the analysis of the archaeological microliths from Geometric Kebaran and Natufian sites in Israel indicate different approaches to the design of projectiles fitted with microliths characteristic for these cultures. The shift in design, associated with such important economic and social transformations as transition to sedentary settlements and a broad-spectrum economy, may reflect a demand for light, flexible and efficient projectile weapons requiring low time and labor investment for preparation and retooling. The use of such efficient weapons in conditions of growing population density and restricted areas available for Natufian hunter–gatherers can be considered as one of the factors that could have affected the subsequent transition to food production that took place in the early Holocene.
Published Version: doi:10.1016/j.jas.2009.09.050
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4270545

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [6885]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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