A Genome Assembly-Integrated Dog 1 Mb BAC Microarray: A Cytogenetic Resource for Canine Cancer Studies and Comparative Genomic Analysis

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A Genome Assembly-Integrated Dog 1 Mb BAC Microarray: A Cytogenetic Resource for Canine Cancer Studies and Comparative Genomic Analysis

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Title: A Genome Assembly-Integrated Dog 1 Mb BAC Microarray: A Cytogenetic Resource for Canine Cancer Studies and Comparative Genomic Analysis
Author: Lindblad-Toh, K.; Langford, C.F.; Thomas, R.; Duke, S. E.; Karlsson, Elinor Kathryn; Evans, A.; Ellis, P.; Breen, M.

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Citation: Thomas, R., S. E. Duke, E. K. Karlsson, A. Evans, P. Ellis, K. Lindblad-Toh, C. F. Langford, and M. Breen. 2008. A genome assembly-integrated dog 1 Mb BAC microarray: a cytogenetic resource for canine cancer studies and comparative genomic analysis. Cytogenetic and Genome Research 122(2): 110-121.
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Abstract: Molecular cytogenetic studies have been instrumental in defining the nature of numerical and structural chromosome changes in human cancers, but their significance remains to be fully understood. The emergence of high quality genome assemblies for several model organisms provides exciting opportunities to develop novel genome-integrated molecular cytogenetic resources that now permit a comparative approach to evaluating the relevance of tumor-associated chromosome aberrations, both within and between species. We have used the dog genome sequence assembly to identify a framework panel of 2,097 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones, selected at intervals of approximately one megabase. Each clone has been evaluated by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to confirm its unique cytogenetic location in concordance with its reported position in the genome assembly, providing new information on the organization of the dog genome. This panel of BAC clones also represents a powerful cytogenetic resource with numerous potential applications. We have used the clone set to develop a genome-wide microarray for comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis, and demonstrate its application in detection of tumor-associated DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) including single copy deletions and amplifications, regional aneuploidy and whole chromosome aneuploidy. We also show how individual clones selected from the BAC panel can be used as FISH probes in direct evaluation of tumor karyotypes, to verify and explore CNAs detected using aCGH analysis. This cytogenetically validated, genome integrated BAC clone panel has enormous potential for aiding gene discovery through a comparative approach to molecular oncology.
Published Version: doi:10.1159/000163088
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2874680/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4515013

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7501]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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