A Critical Role for CD8 T Cells in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Tuberculosis

DSpace/Manakin Repository

A Critical Role for CD8 T Cells in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Tuberculosis

Citable link to this page

. . . . . .

Title: A Critical Role for CD8 T Cells in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Tuberculosis
Author: Chen, Crystal Y.; Shen, Ling; Zeng, Gucheng; Yao, Shuyun; Shen, Yun; Halliday, Lisa; Fortman, Jeff; McAllister, Milton; Estep, Jim; Vasconcelos, Daphne; Du, George; Porcelli, Steven A.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Jacobs, William R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Letvin, Norman Lee; Huang, Dan; Wang, Richard; Hunt, Robert; Chen, Zheng-Yi

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Chen, Crystal Y., Dan Huang, Richard C. Wang, Ling Shen, Gucheng Zeng, Shuyun Yao, Yun Shen, et al. 2009. A critical role for CD8 T cells in a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis. PLoS Pathogens 5(4): e1000392.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: The role of CD8 T cells in anti-tuberculosis immunity in humans remains unknown, and studies of CD8 T cell–mediated protection against tuberculosis in mice have yielded controversial results. Unlike mice, humans and nonhuman primates share a number of important features of the immune system that relate directly to the specificity and functions of CD8 T cells, such as the expression of group 1 CD1 proteins that are capable of presenting Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipids antigens and the cytotoxic/bactericidal protein granulysin. Employing a more relevant nonhuman primate model of human tuberculosis, we examined the contribution of BCG- or M. tuberculosis-elicited CD8 T cells to vaccine-induced immunity against tuberculosis. CD8 depletion compromised BCG vaccine-induced immune control of M. tuberculosis replication in the vaccinated rhesus macaques. Depletion of CD8 T cells in BCG-vaccinated rhesus macaques led to a significant decrease in the vaccine-induced immunity against tuberculosis. Consistently, depletion of CD8 T cells in rhesus macaques that had been previously infected with M. tuberculosis and cured by antibiotic therapy also resulted in a loss of anti-tuberculosis immunity upon M. tuberculosis re-infection. The current study demonstrates a major role for CD8 T cells in anti-tuberculosis immunity, and supports the view that CD8 T cells should be included in strategies for development of new tuberculosis vaccines and immunotherapeutics.
Published Version: doi://10.1371/journal.ppat.1000392
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2663842/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4621016

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters