Effects of Intravenous Ketamine on Explicit and Implicit Measures of Suicidality in Treatment-Resistant Depression

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Effects of Intravenous Ketamine on Explicit and Implicit Measures of Suicidality in Treatment-Resistant Depression

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Title: Effects of Intravenous Ketamine on Explicit and Implicit Measures of Suicidality in Treatment-Resistant Depression
Author: Price, Rebecca B.; Nock, Matthew K.; Charney, Dennis S.; Mathew, Sanjay J.

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Citation: Price, Rebecca B., Matthew K. Nock, Dennis S. Charney, and Sanjay J. Mathew. 2009. Effects of intravenous ketamine on explicit and implicit measures of suicidality in treatment-resistant depression. Biological Psychiatry 66(5): 522-526.
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Abstract: Background Intravenous ketamine has shown rapid antidepressant effects in early trials, making it a potentially attractive candidate for depressed patients at imminent risk of suicide. The Implicit Association Test (IAT), a performance-based measure of association between concepts, may have utility in suicide assessment. Methods Twenty-six patients with treatment-resistant depression were assessed using the suicidality item of the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-SI) 2 hours before and 24 hours following a single subanesthetic dose of intravenous ketamine. Ten patients also completed IATs assessing implicit suicidal associations at comparable time points. In a second study, nine patients received thrice-weekly ketamine infusions over a 12-day period. Results Twenty-four hours after a single infusion, MADRS-SI scores were reduced on average by 2.08 points on a 0 to 6 scale (p < .001; d = 1.37), and 81% of patients received a rating of 0 or 1 postinfusion. Implicit suicidal associations were also reduced following ketamine (p = .003; d = 1.36), with reductions correlated across implicit and explicit measures. MADRS-SI reductions were sustained for 12 days by repeated-dose ketamine (p < .001; d = 2.42). Conclusions These preliminary findings support the premise that ketamine has rapid beneficial effects on suicidal cognition and warrants further study.
Published Version: doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.04.029
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4686793

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7176]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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