Application of Respondent Driven Sampling to Collect Baseline Data on FSWs and MSM for HIV Risk Reduction Interventions in Two Urban Centres in Papua New Guinea

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Application of Respondent Driven Sampling to Collect Baseline Data on FSWs and MSM for HIV Risk Reduction Interventions in Two Urban Centres in Papua New Guinea

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Title: Application of Respondent Driven Sampling to Collect Baseline Data on FSWs and MSM for HIV Risk Reduction Interventions in Two Urban Centres in Papua New Guinea
Author: Yeka, William; Maibani–Michie, Geraldine; Prybylski, Dimitri; Colby, Donn J

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Citation: Yeka, William, Geraldine Maibani–Michie, Dimitri Prybylski, and Donn Colby. 2006. Application of Respondent Driven Sampling to Collect Baseline Data on FSWs and MSM for HIV Risk Reduction Interventions in Two Urban Centres in Papua New Guinea. Journal of Urban Health: Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine 83(Suppl 7): 60-72.
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Abstract: The need to obtain unbiased information among hard–to-reach and hidden populations for behavioural and biological surveillance, epidemiological studies, and intervention program evaluations has led researchers to search for a suitable sampling method. One method that has been tested among IDU and MSM recently is respondent-driven sampling (RDS). We used RDS to conduct a behavioural survey among FSWs and MSM in two urban centres in Papua New Guinea (PNG). In this paper we present the lessons learned implementing RDS in a developing country setting. We also present comparisons of RDSAT-adjusted versus unadjusted crude estimates of some key socio-demographic indicators as well as comparisons between the estimates from RDS and a hypothetical time–location sample (TLS). Overall, the use of RDS among the MSM and FSWs in PNG had numerous advantages in terms of collecting a required sample size in a short time period, minimizing costs and maximising security for staff and respondents. Although there were a few problems these were easily remedied and we would recommend RDS for other similar studies in PNG and other developing countries.
Published Version: doi:10.1007/s11524-006-9103-0
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1705546/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4728515

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