Linkage and Association Analyses of Microsatellites and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Nuclear Families

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Linkage and Association Analyses of Microsatellites and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Nuclear Families

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Title: Linkage and Association Analyses of Microsatellites and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Nuclear Families
Author: Lin, Jennifer Y.; Liu, Kuang-Yu

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Lin, Jennifer, and Kuang-Yu Liu. 2005. Linkage and association analyses of microsatellites and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in nuclear families. BMC Genetics 6(Suppl 1): S25.
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Abstract: Several simulation studies have suggested that a high-density single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) marker set may be as useful as a traditional microsatellites (MS) marker set in performing whole-genome linkage analysis. However, very few studies have directly tested the SNPs-based genome-wide scan. In the present study, we compared the linkage results from the SNPs-based scan with a map density of 3-cM spacing with those from the MS scan using a 10-cM marker set among 300 nuclear families each from the Aipotu (AI), Danacaa (DA), and Karangar (KA) populations from the simulated Genetic Analysis Workshop 14 Problem 2 data. We found that information contents obtained from the SNPs scan were somewhat lower than those from the MS scan. However, the linkage results obtained from the two scans showed a high degree of similarity. Both scans identified a similar number of chromosomal regions attaining nominal significance (p < 0.05). Specifically, both scans detected confirmed evidence for linkage (NPL ≥ 4.07, p = 2 × 10-5) to chromosome 1 in the AI families, chromosomes 1 and 3 in the DA families, and chromosomes 3, 5, and 9 in the KA families. An additional confirmed linkage to chromosome 5 in the AI families was detected only by the MS scan. We also observed slightly wider 1-LOD intervals for more of the SNP peaks than for the MS peaks, which is likely due to lower information contents for the SNPs. Subsequent fine-mapping association analysis further identified 2 to 3 markers significantly associated with disease status in each population; B03T3056, B03T3058, and B05T4139 in the AI population, B03T3056 and B03T3058 in the KA population, and B03T3056, B03T3057, and B03T3058 in the DA population. Among the four markers, three were chosen based on results obtained from the two scans, but one was solely from the SNP scan. In summary, our finding suggests that the SNP-based genome scan has the potential to be as powerful as the traditional MS-based scan and offers good identification of peak location for further fine-mapped association analysis.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/1471-2156-6-S1-S25
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1866761/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4734538

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