A Systematic Approach to Performing a Comprehensive Transesophageal Echocardiogram. A Call to Order

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A Systematic Approach to Performing a Comprehensive Transesophageal Echocardiogram. A Call to Order

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Title: A Systematic Approach to Performing a Comprehensive Transesophageal Echocardiogram. A Call to Order
Author: Kothavale, Avinash A; Yeon, Susan B.; Manning, Warren J.

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Citation: Kothavale, Avinash A, Susan B Yeon, and Warren J Manning. 2009. A systematic approach to performing a comprehensive transesophageal echocardiogram. A call to order. BMC Cardiovascular Disorders 9: 18.
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Abstract: Background: While the order for a clinical transthoracic examination is fairly standardized, there is considerable variability between laboratories and even among physicians in the same laboratory with regard to the order for transesophageal echocardiograms (TEE). A systematic approach is desirable for more efficient use of physician and patient time, avoidance of inadvertent omission of important views, and to facilitate study review. Methods: We propose a standardized approach to TEE data acquisition in which cardiac structures are systematically identified and characterized at sequential positions and imaging planes to facilitate organized, efficient and comprehensive assessment. Results: Our approach to TEE study begins in the mid-esophagus with the imaging plane at 0°. Based on the specific indication for the TEE, a cardiac structure (e.g., mitral valve, left atrial appendage, or interatrial septum) is chosen as the primary focal point for a comprehensive, multiplane analysis. This structure is assessed in 20° – 30° increments as the imaging plane is advanced from 0° to 165°. Using the aortic valve as a reference point, pertinent cardiac structures are then assessed as the imaging plane is reduced to 135°, to 90°, to 40 – 60° and then back to 0°. The probe is then advanced into the stomach to obtain transgastric images at 0°, 90°, and 120°. Finally, the thoracic aorta and pulmonary artery are assessed as the probe is withdrawn from the body. Using this method, an organized and comprehensive TEE can be performed in 10 – 15 minutes. Conclusion: A standardized and systematic TEE approach is described for efficient and comprehensive TEE study.
Published Version: doi://10.1186/1471-2261-9-18
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2694155/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4773894

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