Steady state bioequivalence of generic and innovator formulations of stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine in HIV-infected Ugandan adults

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Steady state bioequivalence of generic and innovator formulations of stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine in HIV-infected Ugandan adults

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Title: Steady state bioequivalence of generic and innovator formulations of stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine in HIV-infected Ugandan adults
Author: Byakika-Tusiime, Jayne; Chinn, Leslie W.; Oyugi, Jessica H.; Obua, Celestino; Kroetz, Deanna L.; Myer, Landon; Bangsberg, David Roy

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Citation: Byakika-Tusiime, Jayne, Leslie W. Chinn, Jessica H. Oyugi, Celestino Obua, David R. Bangsberg, and Deanna L. Kroetz. 2008. Steady state bioequivalence of generic and innovator formulations of stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine in HIV-infected Ugandan adults. PLoS ONE 3(12): e3981.
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Abstract: Background: Generic antiretroviral therapy is the mainstay of HIV treatment in resource-limited settings, yet there is little evidence confirming the bioequivalence of generic and brand name formulations. We compared the steady-state pharmacokinetics of lamivudine, stavudine and nevirapine in HIV-infected subjects who were receiving a generic formulation (Triomune®) or the corresponding brand formulations (Epivir®, Zerit®, and Viramune®). Methodology/Principal Findings: An open-label, randomized, crossover study was carried out in 18 HIV-infected Ugandan subjects stabilized on Triomune-40. Subjects received lamivudine (150 mg), stavudine (40 mg), and nevirapine (200 mg) in either the generic or brand formulation twice a day for 30 days, before switching to the other formulation. At the end of each treatment period, blood samples were collected over 12 h for pharmacokinetic analysis. The main outcome measures were the mean AUC0–12h and Cmax. Bioequivalence was defined as a geometric mean ratio between the generic and brand name within the 90% confidence interval of 0.8–1.25. The geometric mean ratios and the 90% confidence intervals were: stavudine Cmax, 1.3 (0.99–1.71) and AUC0–12h, 1.1 (0.87–1.38); lamivudine Cmax, 0.8 (0.63–0.98) and AUC0–12h, 0.8 (0.65–0.99); and nevirapine Cmax, 1.1 (0.95–1.23) and AUC0–12h, 1.1 (0.95–1.31). The generic formulation was not statistically bioequivalent to the brand formulations during steady state, although exposures were comparable. A mixed random effects model identified about 50% intersubject variability in the pharmacokinetic parameters. Conclusions/Significant Findings: These findings provide support for the use of Triomune in resource-limited settings, although identification of the sources of intersubject variability in these populations is critical.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0003981
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2602850/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4853391

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