Night heart rate variability and particulate exposures among boilermaker construction workers

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Night heart rate variability and particulate exposures among boilermaker construction workers

Citable link to this page

. . . . . .

Title: Night heart rate variability and particulate exposures among boilermaker construction workers
Author: Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Cavallari, Jennifer Margaret; Eisen, Ellen A.; Fang, Shona C.; Dobson, Christine; Schwartz, Joel David; Christiani, David C.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Cavallari, Jennifer M., Ellen A. Eisen, Jiu-Chiuan Chen, Shona C. Fang, Christine B. Dobson, Joel Schwartz, and David C. Christiani. 2007. Night heart rate variability and particulate exposures among boilermaker construction workers. Environmental Health Perspectives 115(7): 1046-1051.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Background: Although studies have documented the association between heart rate variability (HRV) and ambient particulate exposures, the association between HRV, especially at night, and metal-rich, occupational particulate exposures remains unclear. Objective: Our goal in this study was to investigate the association between long-duration HRV, including nighttime HRV, and occupational PM2.5 exposures. Methods: We used 24-hr ambulatory electrocardiograms (ECGs) to monitor 36 male boilermaker welders (mean age of 41 years) over a workday and nonworkday. ECGs were analyzed for HRV in the time domain; rMSSD (square root of the mean squared differences of successive intervals), SDNN (SD of normal-to-normal intervals over entire recording), and SDNNi (SDNN for all 5-min segments) were summarized over 24-hr, day (0730–2130 hours), and night (0000–0700 hours) periods. PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm) exposures were monitored over the workday, and 8-hr time-weighted average concentrations were calculated. We used linear regression to assess the associations between HRV and workday particulate exposures. Matched measurements from a nonworkday were used to control for individual cardiac risk factors. Results: Mean (± SD) PM2.5 exposure was 0.73 ± 0.50 mg/m3 and ranged from 0.04 to 2.70 mg/m3. We observed a consistent inverse exposure–response relationship, with a decrease in all HRV measures with increased PM2.5 exposure. However, the decrease was most pronounced at night, where a 1-mg/m3 increase in PM2.5 was associated with a change of −8.32 [95% confidence interval (CI), −16.29 to −0.35] msec nighttime rMSSD, −14.77 (95% CI, −31.52 to 1.97) msec nighttime SDNN, and −8.37 (95% CI, −17.93 to 1.20) msec nighttime SDNNi, after adjusting for nonworking nighttime HRV, age, and smoking. Conclusion: Metal-rich particulate exposures were associated with decreased long-duration HRV, especially at night. Further research is needed to elucidate which particulate metal constituent is responsible for decreased HRV.
Published Version: doi:10.1289/ehp.10019
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1913585/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4874759

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters