A qualitative study of perceived social barriers to care for eating disorders: Perspectives from ethnically diverse health care consumers

DSpace/Manakin Repository

A qualitative study of perceived social barriers to care for eating disorders: Perspectives from ethnically diverse health care consumers

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Hadley Arrindell, Adrienne
dc.contributor.author Perloe, Alexandra
dc.contributor.author Fay, Kristen
dc.contributor.author Striegel-Moore, Ruth H
dc.contributor.author Becker, Anne Edith
dc.date.accessioned 2011-04-23T01:07:16Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.citation Becker, Anne E., Adrienne Hadley Arrindell, Alexandra Perloe, Kristen Fay, and Ruth H. Striegel-Moore. 2010. A qualitative study of perceived social barriers to care for eating disorders: Perspectives from ethnically diverse health care consumers. The International Journal of Eating Disorders 43(7): 633-647. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0276-3478 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4874768
dc.description.abstract Objective: The study aim was to identify and describe health consumer perspectives on social barriers to care for eating disorders in an ethnically diverse sample. Method: We conducted an exploratory secondary analysis of qualitative data comprising transcripts from semi-structured interviews with past and prospective consumers of eating disorder treatment (n = 32). Transcripts were inputted into NVivo 8 for coding, sorting, and quantifying thematic content of interest within strata defined by ethnic minority and non-minority participants. We then examined the influence of key social barriers—including stigma and social stereotypes—on perceived impact on care. Results: The majority of respondents (78%) endorsed at least one social barrier to care for an eating or weight concern. Perceived stigma (or shame) and social stereotyping—identified both within social networks and among clinicians—had adversely impacted care for 59% and 19% of respondents, respectively. Discussion: Social barriers to care for eating and weight related concerns may be prevalent in the U.S. and impact both ethnic minority and non-minority health care consumers. © 2009 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company en_US
dc.relation.isversionof doi:10.1002/eat.20755 en_US
dc.relation.hasversion http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3020364/pdf/ en_US
dash.license LAA
dc.subject ethnicity en_US
dc.subject stereotypes en_US
dc.subject stigma en_US
dc.subject eating disorders en_US
dc.subject access to care en_US
dc.title A qualitative study of perceived social barriers to care for eating disorders: Perspectives from ethnically diverse health care consumers en_US
dc.type Journal Article en_US
dc.description.version Version of Record en_US
dc.relation.journal The International Journal of Eating Disorders en_US
dash.depositing.author Becker, Anne Edith
dc.date.available 2011-04-23T01:07:16Z
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Global Health and Social Medicine en_US
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Psychiatry-Massachusetts General Hospital en_US
dash.affiliation.other HMS^M.D. Ph.D. Program en_US

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
3020364.pdf 180.3Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters