Cognitive Function Is Disrupted by Both Hypo- and Hyperglycemia in School-Aged Children With Type 1 Diabetes: A Field Study

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Cognitive Function Is Disrupted by Both Hypo- and Hyperglycemia in School-Aged Children With Type 1 Diabetes: A Field Study

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Title: Cognitive Function Is Disrupted by Both Hypo- and Hyperglycemia in School-Aged Children With Type 1 Diabetes: A Field Study
Author: Gonder-Frederick, Linda A.; Bauchowitz, Andrea U.; Magee, Joshua C.; Cox, Daniel J.; Clarke, William L.; Zrebiec, John Frank; Ritterband, Lee M.

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Citation: Gonder-Frederick, Linda A., John F. Zrebiec, Andrea U. Bauchowitz, Lee M. Ritterband, Joshua C. Magee, Daniel J. Cox, and William L. Clarke. 2009. Cognitive function is disrupted by both hypo- and hyperglycemia in school-aged children with type 1 diabetes: a field study. Diabetes Care 32(6): 1001-1006.
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Abstract: Objective: We developed a field procedure using personal digital assistant (PDA) technology to test the hypothesis that naturally occurring episodes of hypo- and hyperglycemia are associated with deterioration in cognitive function in children with type 1 diabetes. Research Design and Methods: A total of 61 children aged 6–11 years with type 1 diabetes received a PDA programmed with two brief cognitive tests (mental math and choice reaction time), which they completed just before home glucose readings. The computer recorded time to complete each test and number of correct responses. Children completed several trials per day over 4–6 weeks for a total of 70 trials. Performance variables were compared across glucose ranges. Individual impairment scores (IISs) were also computed for each child by calculating the SD between performance during euglycemia and that during glucose extremes. Results: Time to complete both mental math and reaction time was significantly longer during hypoglycemia. During hyperglycemia, time to complete math was significantly longer and reaction time was marginally significant (P = 0.053). There were no differences on task accuracy. Decline in mental math performance was equivalent at glucose levels <3.0 and >22.2 mmol/l. IISs varied greatly across children, with no age or sex differences. Conclusions: A decrease in mental efficiency occurs with naturally occurring hypo- and hyperglycemic glucose fluctuations in children with type 1 diabetes, and this effect can be detected with a field procedure using PDA technology. With blood glucose levels >22.2 mmol/l, cognitive deterioration equals that associated with significant hypoglycemia.
Published Version: doi:10.2337/dc08-1722
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2681021/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4874772

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