The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: results of an international guideline-based performance improvement program targeting severe sepsis

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The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: results of an international guideline-based performance improvement program targeting severe sepsis

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Title: The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: results of an international guideline-based performance improvement program targeting severe sepsis
Author: Levy, Mitchell M.; Dellinger, R. Phillip; Townsend, Sean R.; Linde-Zwirble, Walter T.; Bion, Julian; Schorr, Christa; Artigas, Antonio; Ramsay, Graham; Beale, Richard; Parker, Margaret M.; Gerlach, Herwig; Reinhart, Konrad; Silva, Eliezer; Harvey, Maurene; Angus, Derek C.; Marshall, John C.; Regan, Susan

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Levy, Mitchell M., R. Phillip Dellinger, Sean R. Townsend, Walter T. Linde-Zwirble, John C. Marshall, Julian Bion, Christa Schorr, et al. 2010. The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: results of an international guideline-based performance improvement program targeting severe sepsis. Intensive Care Medicine 36(2): 222-231.
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Abstract: Objective: The Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC or “the Campaign”) developed guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock. A performance improvement initiative targeted changing clinical behavior (process improvement) via bundles based on key SSC guideline recommendations on process improvement and patient outcomes. Design and setting: A multifaceted intervention to facilitate compliance with selected guideline recommendations in the ICU, ED, and wards of individual hospitals and regional hospital networks was implemented voluntarily in the US, Europe, and South America. Elements of the guidelines were “bundled” into two sets of targets to be completed within 6 h and within 24 h. An analysis was conducted on data submitted from January 2005 through March 2008. Main results: Data from 15,022 subjects at 165 sites were analyzed to determine the compliance with bundle targets and association with hospital mortality. Compliance with the entire resuscitation bundle increased linearly from 10.9% in the first site quarter to 31.3% by the end of 2 years (P < 0.0001). Compliance with the entire management bundle started at 18.4% in the first quarter and increased to 36.1% by the end of 2 years (P = 0.008). Compliance with all bundle elements increased significantly, except for inspiratory plateau pressure, which was high at baseline. Unadjusted hospital mortality decreased from 37 to 30.8% over 2 years (P = 0.001). The adjusted odds ratio for mortality improved the longer a site was in the Campaign, resulting in an adjusted absolute drop of 0.8% per quarter and 5.4% over 2 years (95% CI, 2.5–8.4%). Conclusions: The Campaign was associated with sustained, continuous quality improvement in sepsis care. Although not necessarily cause and effect, a reduction in reported hospital mortality rates was associated with participation. The implications of this study may serve as an impetus for similar improvement efforts.Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-009-1738-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
Published Version: doi:10.1007/s00134-009-1738-3
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2826633/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4874821

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