A QTL Genome Scan of the Metabolic Syndrome and its Component Traits

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A QTL Genome Scan of the Metabolic Syndrome and its Component Traits

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dc.contributor.author McQueen, Matthew B
dc.contributor.author Bertram, Lars
dc.contributor.author Rimm, Eric B.
dc.contributor.author Blacker, Deborah Lynne
dc.contributor.author Santangelo, Susan L.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-09T04:02:32Z
dc.date.issued 2003
dc.identifier.citation McQueen, Matthew B., Lars Bertram, Eric B. Rimm, Deborah Blacker, and Susan L. Santangelo. 2003. A QTL genome scan of the metabolic syndrome and its component traits. BMC Genetics 4: S96. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2156 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4882988
dc.description.abstract Background: Because high blood pressure, altered lipid levels, obesity, and diabetes so frequently occur together, they are sometimes collectively referred to as the metabolic syndrome. While there have been many studies of each metabolic syndrome trait separately, few studies have attempted to analyze them combined, i.e., as one composite variable, in quantitative trait linkage or association analysis. We used genotype and phenotype data from the Framingham Heart Study to perform a full-genome scan for quantitative trait loci underlying the metabolic syndrome. Results: Heritability estimates for all of the covariate-adjusted and age- and gender-standardized individual traits, and the composite metabolic syndrome trait, were all fairly high (0.39–0.62), and the composite trait was among the highest at 0.61. The composite trait yielded no regions with suggestive linkage by Lander and Kruglyak's criteria, although there were several noteworthy regions for individual traits, some of which were also observed for the composite variable. Conclusion: Despite its high heritability, the composite metabolic syndrome trait variable did not increase the power to detect or localize linkage peaks in this sample. However, this strategy and related methods of combining correlated individual traits deserve further investigation, particularly in settings with complex causal pathways. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_US
dc.relation.isversionof doi:10.1186/1471-2156-4-S1-S96 en_US
dc.relation.hasversion http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1866537/pdf/ en_US
dash.license LAA
dc.title A QTL Genome Scan of the Metabolic Syndrome and its Component Traits en_US
dc.type Journal Article en_US
dc.description.version Version of Record en_US
dc.relation.journal BMC Genetics en_US
dash.depositing.author Rimm, Eric B.
dc.date.available 2011-05-09T04:02:32Z
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospital en_US
dash.affiliation.other SPH^Nutrition en_US
dash.affiliation.other SPH^Epidemiology en_US
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Psychiatry-Massachusetts General Hospital en_US

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