Obesity is a modifier of autonomic cardiac responses to fine metal particulates

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Obesity is a modifier of autonomic cardiac responses to fine metal particulates

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dc.contributor.author Chen, Jiu-Chiuan
dc.contributor.author Cavallari, Jennifer Margaret
dc.contributor.author Stone, Peter Howard
dc.contributor.author Christiani, David C.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-10T01:23:35Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier.citation Chen, Jiu-Chiuan, Jennifer M. Cavallari, Peter H. Stone, and David C. Christiani. 2007. Obesity is a modifier of autonomic cardiac responses to fine metal particulates. Environmental Health Perspectives 115(7): 1002-1006. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0091-6765 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4885967
dc.description.abstract Background: Increasing evidence suggests that obesity may impart greater susceptibility to adverse effects of air pollution. Particulate matter, especially PM\(_{2.5}\) (particulate matter with aero-dynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm), is associated with increased cardiac events and reduction of heart rate variability (HRV).Objectives Our goal was to investigate whether particle-mediated autonomic modulation is aggravated in obese individuals.Methods We examined PM\(_{2.5}\)-mediated acute effects on HRV and heart rate (HR) using 10 24-hr and 13 48-hr ambulatory electrocardiogram recordings collected from 18 boilermakers (39.5 ± 9.1 years of age) exposed to high levels of metal particulates. Average HR and 5-min HRV [SDNN: standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (NN); rMSSD: square-root of mean squared-differences of successive NN intervals; HF: high-frequency power 0.15–0.4 Hz] and personal PM\(_{2.5}\) exposures were continuously monitored. Subjects with body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m\(^2\) were classified as obese. Mixed-effect models were used for statistical analyses. Results: Half (50%) of the study subjects were obese. After adjustment for confounders, each 1-mg/m\(^3\) increase in 4-hr moving average PM\(_{2.5}\) was associated with HR increase of 5.9 bpm [95% confidence interval (CI), 4.2 to 7.7] and with 5-min HRV reduction by 6.5% (95% CI, 1.9 to 11.3%) for SDNN, 1.7% (95% CI, –4.9 to 8.4%) for rMSSD, and 8.8% (95% CI, –3.8 to 21.3%) for HF. Obese individuals had greater PM\(_{2.5}\)-mediated HRV reductions (2- to 3-fold differences) than nonobese individuals, and had more PM\(_{2.5}\)-mediated HR increases (9-bpm vs. 4-bpm increase in HR for each 1-mg/m\(^3\) increase in PM\(_{2.5}\); p < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study revealed greater autonomic cardiac responses to metal particulates in obese workers, supporting the hypothesis that obesity may impart greater susceptibility to acute cardiovascular effects of fine particles. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences en_US
dc.relation.isversionof doi:10.1289/ehp.9609 en_US
dc.relation.hasversion http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1913600/pdf/ en_US
dash.license LAA
dc.subject air pollution en_US
dc.subject environmental health en_US
dc.subject heart rate variability en_US
dc.subject obesity en_US
dc.subject risk factors en_US
dc.subject susceptibility en_US
dc.title Obesity is a modifier of autonomic cardiac responses to fine metal particulates en_US
dc.type Journal Article en_US
dc.description.version Version of Record en_US
dc.relation.journal Environmental Health Perspectives en_US
dash.depositing.author Cavallari, Jennifer Margaret
dc.date.available 2011-05-10T01:23:35Z
dash.affiliation.other SPH^Environmental+Occupational Medicine+Epi en_US
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Medicine-Massachusetts General Hospital en_US
dash.affiliation.other SPH^Environmental+Occupational Medicine+Epi en_US

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