Screening High School Students for Eating Disorders: Results of a National Initiative

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Screening High School Students for Eating Disorders: Results of a National Initiative

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dc.contributor.author Ziyadeh, Najat J.
dc.contributor.author Prokop, Lisa A.
dc.contributor.author Keliher, Anne
dc.contributor.author Austin, Sydney Bryn
dc.contributor.author Forman, Sara F.
dc.contributor.author Jacobs, Douglas George
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-11T02:06:45Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Austin, S. Bryn, Najat J. Ziyadeh, Sara Forman, Lisa A. Prokop, Anne Keliher, and Douglas Jacobs. 2008. Screening High School Students for Eating Disorders: Results of a National Initiative. Preventing Chronic Disease 5(4). en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1545-1151 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4887113
dc.description.abstract Introduction: Early identification and treatment of disordered eating and weight control behaviors may prevent progression and reduce the risk of chronic health consequences. Methods: The National Eating Disorders Screening Program coordinated the first-ever nationwide eating disorders screening initiative for high schools in the United States in 2000. Students completed a self-report screening questionnaire that included the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) and items on vomiting or exercising to control weight, binge eating, and history of treatment for eating disorders. Multivariate regression analyses examined sex and racial/ethnic differences. Results: Almost 15% of girls and 4% of boys scored at or above the threshold of 20 on the EAT-26, which indicated a possible eating disorder. Among girls, we observed few significant differences between ethnic groups in eating disorder symptoms, whereas among boys, more African American, American Indian, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Latino boys reported symptoms than did white boys. Overall, 25% of girls and 11% of boys reported disordered eating and weight control symptoms severe enough to warrant clinical evaluation. Of these symptomatic students, few reported that they had ever received treatment. Conclusion: Population screening for eating disorders in high schools may identify at-risk students who would benefit from early intervention, which could prevent acute and long-term complications of disordered eating and weight control behaviors. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Centers for Disease Control and Prevention en_US
dc.relation.isversionof http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2008/oct/07_0164.htm en_US
dc.relation.hasversion http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2578782/pdf/ en_US
dash.license LAA
dc.title Screening High School Students for Eating Disorders: Results of a National Initiative en_US
dc.type Journal Article en_US
dc.description.version Version of Record en_US
dc.relation.journal Preventing Chronic Disease en_US
dash.depositing.author Austin, Sydney Bryn
dc.date.available 2011-05-11T02:06:45Z
dash.affiliation.other SPH^Society Human Development and Health en_US
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Pediatrics-Children's Hospital en_US
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Pediatrics-Children's Hospital en_US
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Psychiatry-McLean Hospital en_US

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