Diabetes, Obesity, and Hypertension May Enhance Associations between Air Pollution and Markers of Systemic Inflammation

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Diabetes, Obesity, and Hypertension May Enhance Associations between Air Pollution and Markers of Systemic Inflammation

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Title: Diabetes, Obesity, and Hypertension May Enhance Associations between Air Pollution and Markers of Systemic Inflammation
Author: Dubowsky, Sara D.; Suh, Helen; Schwartz, Joel David; Coull, Brent Andrew; Gold, Diane R.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Dubowsky, Sara D., Helen Suh, Joel Schwartz, Brent A. Coull, and Diane R. Gold. 2006. Diabetes, Obesity, and Hypertension May Enhance Associations between Air Pollution and Markers of Systemic Inflammation. Environmental Health Perspectives 114(7): 992-998.
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Abstract: Airborne particulate matter (PM) may lead to increased cardiac risk through
an inflammatory pathway. Therefore, we investigated associations
between ambient PM and markers of systemic inflammation among repeated
measures from 44 senior citizens (≥ 60 years of age) and examined
susceptibility by conditions linked to chronic inflammation. Mixed
models were used to identify associations between concentrations of
fine PM [aerodynamic diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5)] averaged over 1–7 days and measures of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and white blood cells (WBCs). Effect
modification was investigated for diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and
elevated mean inflammatory markers. We found positive associations
between longer moving averages of PM2.5 and WBCs across all participants, with a 5.5% [95% confidence
interval (CI), 0.10 to 11%] increase per
interquartile increase (5.4 μg/m3) of PM2.5 averaged over the previous week. PM2.5 and CRP also exhibited positive associations among all individuals for
averages longer than 1 day, with the largest associations for persons
with diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. For example, an interquartile
increase in the 5-day mean PM2.5 (6.1 μg/m3) was associated with a 14% increase in CRP (95% CI, −5.4 to 37%) for all individuals and an 81% (95% CI, 21 to 172%) increase for persons with diabetes, obesity, and
hypertension. Persons with diabetes, obesity, and hypertension
also exhibited positive associations between PM2.5 and IL-6. Individuals with elevated mean inflammatory markers exhibited
enhanced associations with CRP, IL-6, and WBCs. We found modest positive
associations between PM2.5 and indicators of systemic inflammation, with larger associations suggested
for individuals with diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and elevated
mean inflammatory markers.
Published Version: doi:10.1289/ehp.8469
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1513328/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4887119

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