Home endotoxin exposure and wheeze in infants: correction for bias due to exposure measurement error

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Home endotoxin exposure and wheeze in infants: correction for bias due to exposure measurement error

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Title: Home endotoxin exposure and wheeze in infants: correction for bias due to exposure measurement error
Author: Horick, Nora; Weller, Edie A.; Milton, Donald Kirby; Gold, Diane R.; Li, Ruifeng; Spiegelman, Donna Lynn

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Horick, Nora, Edie Weller, Donald K. Milton, Diane R. Gold, Ruifeng Li, and Donna Spiegelman. 2006. Home endotoxin exposure and wheeze in infants: correction for bias due to exposure measurement error. Environmental Health Perspectives 114(1): 135-140.
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Abstract: Exposure to elevated levels of endotoxin in family-room dust was previously observed to be significantly associated with increased wheeze in the first year of life among a cohort of 404 children in the Boston, Massachusetts, metropolitan area. However, it is likely that family-room dust endotoxin was a surrogate for airborne endotoxin exposure. Therefore, a related substudy characterized the relationship between levels of airborne household endotoxin and the level of endotoxin present in house dust, in addition to identifying other significant predictors of airborne endotoxin in the home. We now reexamine the relationship between endotoxin exposure and wheeze under the assumption that the level of airborne endotoxin in the home is the exposure of interest and that the amount of endotoxin in household dust is a surrogate for this exposure. We applied a measurement error correction technique, using all available data to estimate the effect of endotoxin exposure in terms of airborne concentration and accounting for the measurement error induced by using house-dust endotoxin as a surrogate measure in the portion of the data in which airborne endotoxin could not be directly measured. After adjusting for confounding by lower respiratory infection status and race/ethnicity, endotoxin exposure was found to be significantly associated with a nearly 6-fold increase in prevalence of wheeze for a one interquartile range increase in airborne endotoxin (95% confidence interval, 1.2–26) among the 360 children in households with dust endotoxin levels between the 5th and 95th percentiles.
Published Version: doi:10.1289/ehp.7981
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1332669/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4887123

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