Common ataxia telangiectasia mutated haplotypes and risk of breast cancer: a nested case–control study

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Common ataxia telangiectasia mutated haplotypes and risk of breast cancer: a nested case–control study

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Title: Common ataxia telangiectasia mutated haplotypes and risk of breast cancer: a nested case–control study
Author: Kraft, Peter; Tamimi, Rulla May; Hankinson, Susan Elizabeth; Spiegelman, Donna Lynn; Colditz, Graham A.; Hunter, David J.

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Citation: Tamimi, Rulla M., Susan E. Hankinson, Donna Spiegelman, Peter Kraft, Graham A. Colditz, and David J. Hunter. 2004. Common ataxia telangiectasia mutated haplotypes and risk of breast cancer: a nested case - control study. Breast Cancer Research 6(4): R416-R422.
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Abstract: Introduction: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene is a tumor suppressor gene with functions in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Based on family studies, women heterozygous for mutations in the ATM gene are reported to have a fourfold to fivefold increased risk of breast cancer compared with noncarriers of the mutations, although not all studies have confirmed this association. Haplotype analysis has been suggested as an efficient method for investigating the role of common variation in the ATM gene and breast cancer. Five biallelic haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms are estimated to capture 99% of the haplotype diversity in Caucasian populations. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study of breast cancer within the Nurses' Health Study cohort to address the role of common ATM haplotypes and breast cancer. Cases and controls were genotyped for five haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms. Haplotypes were predicted for 1309 cases and 1761 controls for which genotype information was available. Results: Six unique haplotypes were predicted in this study, five of which occur at a frequency of 5% or greater. The overall distribution of haplotypes was not significantly different between cases and controls (χ2 = 3.43, five degrees of freedom, P = 0.63). Conclusion: There was no evidence that common haplotypes of ATM are associated with breast cancer risk. Extensive single nucleotide polymorphism detection using the entire genomic sequence of ATM will be necessary to rule out less common variation in ATM and sporadic breast cancer risk.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/bcr809
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC468661/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4891653

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