Childhood infections and asthma: at the crossroads of the hygiene and Barker hypotheses

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Childhood infections and asthma: at the crossroads of the hygiene and Barker hypotheses

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Title: Childhood infections and asthma: at the crossroads of the hygiene and Barker hypotheses
Author: Tantisira, Kelan; Weiss, Scott Tillman

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Tantisira, Kelan G., and Scott T. Weiss. 2001. Childhood infections and asthma: at the crossroads of the hygiene and Barker hypotheses. Respiratory Research 2(6): 324-327.
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Abstract: The hygiene hypothesis states that childhood asthma develops as a result of decreased exposure to infectious agents during infancy and early childhood. This results in the persistence of the neonatal T helper lymphocyte 2 immunophenotype, thereby predisposing the child to atopic disease. While multiple studies support the hygiene hypothesis in asthma ontogeny, the evidence remains inconclusive; multiple other environmental exposures in early childhood also alter predisposition to asthma. Moreover, the current paradigm for asthma development extends far beyond simple childhood environmental exposures to include fetal development, genetic predisposition, and interactions of the developmental state and genetics with the environment.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/rr81
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC64800/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4891665

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