Biological variability dominates and influences analytical variance in HPLC-ECD studies of the human plasma metabolome

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Biological variability dominates and influences analytical variance in HPLC-ECD studies of the human plasma metabolome

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Title: Biological variability dominates and influences analytical variance in HPLC-ECD studies of the human plasma metabolome
Author: Shurubor, Yevgeniya I; Matson, Wayne R; Willett, Walter C.; Hankinson, Susan Elizabeth; Kristal, Bruce S.

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Citation: Shurubor, Yevgeniya I., Wayne R. Matson, Walter C. Willett, Susan E. Hankinson, and Bruce S. Kristal. 2007. Biological variability dominates and influences analytical variance in HPLC-ECD studies of the human plasma metabolome. BMC Clinical Pathology 7: 9.
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Abstract: Background: Biomarker-based assessments of biological samples are widespread in clinical, pre-clinical, and epidemiological investigations. We previously developed serum metabolomic profiles assessed by HPLC-separations coupled with coulometric array detection that can accurately identify ad libitum fed and caloric-restricted rats. These profiles are being adapted for human epidemiology studies, given the importance of energy balance in human disease. Methods: Human plasma samples were biochemically analyzed using HPLC separations coupled with coulometric electrode array detection. Results: We identified these markers/metabolites in human plasma, and then used them to determine which human samples represent blinded duplicates with 100% accuracy (N = 30 of 30). At least 47 of 61 metabolites tested were sufficiently stable for use even after 48 hours of exposure to shipping conditions. Stability of some metabolites differed between individuals (N = 10 at 0, 24, and 48 hours), suggesting the influence of some biological factors on parameters normally considered as analytical. Conclusion: Overall analytical precision (mean median CV, ~9%) and total between-person variation (median CV, ~50–70%) appear well suited to enable use of metabolomics markers in human clinical trials and epidemiological studies, including studies of the effect of caloric intake and balance on long-term cancer risk.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/1472-6890-7-9
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2203971/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4891672

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