Hair Manganese and Hyperactive Behaviors: Pilot Study of School-Age Children Exposed through Tap Water

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Hair Manganese and Hyperactive Behaviors: Pilot Study of School-Age Children Exposed through Tap Water

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Title: Hair Manganese and Hyperactive Behaviors: Pilot Study of School-Age Children Exposed through Tap Water
Author: Bouchard, Maryse; Laforest, François; Vandelac, Louise; Mergler, Donna; Bellinger, David C.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Bouchard, Maryse, François Laforest, Louise Vandelac, David Bellinger, and Donna Mergler. 2007. Hair Manganese and Hyperactive Behaviors: Pilot Study of School-Age Children Exposed through Tap Water. Environmental Health Perspectives 115(1): 122-127.
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Abstract: Background: Neurotoxic effects are known to occur with inhalation of manganese particulates, but very few data are available on exposure to Mn in water. We undertook a pilot study in a community in Québec (Canada) where naturally occurring high Mn levels were present in the public water system. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that greater exposure to Mn via drinking water would be reflected in higher Mn content in hair which, in turn, would be associated with increased level of hyperactive behaviors. Methods: Forty-six children participated in the study, 24 boys and 22 girls, 6–15 years of age (median, 11 years). Their homes received water from one of two wells (W) with different Mn concentrations: W1: mean 610 μg/L; W2: mean 160 μg/L. The Revised Conners’ Rating Scale for parents (CPRS-R) and for teachers (CTRS-R) were administered, providing T-scores on the following subscales: Oppositional, Hyperactivity, Cognitive Problems/Inattention, and ADHD Index. Results: Children whose houses were supplied by W1 had higher hair Mn (MnH) than those supplied by W2 (mean 6.2 ± 4.7 μg/g vs. 3.3 ± 3.0 μg/g, p = 0.025). MnH was significantly associated with T-scores on the CTRS-R Oppositional (p = 0.020) and Hyperactivity (p = 0.002) subscales, after adjustment for age, sex, and income. All children with Oppositional and Hyperactivity T-scores ≥ 65 had MnH > 3.0 μg/g. Conclusions: The findings of this pilot study are sufficiently compelling to warrant more extensive investigations into the risks of Mn exposure in drinking water.
Published Version: doi:10.1289/ehp.9504
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1797845/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4892215

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