Metabolic syndrome and inflammatory responses to long-term particulate air pollutants

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Metabolic syndrome and inflammatory responses to long-term particulate air pollutants

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Title: Metabolic syndrome and inflammatory responses to long-term particulate air pollutants
Author: Chen, Jiu-Chiuan; Schwartz, Joel David

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Chen, Jiu-Chiuan and Joel Schwartz. 2008. Metabolic syndrome and inflammatory responses to long-term particulate air pollutants. Environmental Health Perspectives 116(5): 612-617.
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Abstract: Background: Human data linking inflammation with long-term particulate matter (PM) exposure are still lacking. Emerging evidence suggests that people with metabolic syndrome (MS) may be a more susceptible population. Objectives: Our goal was to examine potential inflammatory responses associated with long-term PM exposure and MS-dependent susceptibility. Methods: We conducted secondary analyses of white blood cell (WBC) count and MS data from The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and PM\(_{10}\) (PM with aerodynamic diameter < 10 μm) data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Aerometric Information Retrieval System. Estimated 1-year PM\(_{10}\) exposures were aggregated at the centroid of each residential census-block group, using distance-weighted averages from all monitors in the residing and adjoining counties. We restricted our analyses to adults (20–89 years of age) with normal WBC (4,000–11,000 × 10\(^6\)/L), no existing cardiovascular disease, complete PM\(_{10}\) and MS data, and living in current residences > 1 year (n = 2,978; age 48.5 ± 17.8 years). Mixed-effects models were constructed to account for autocorrelation and potential confounders. Results: After adjustment for demographics, socioeconomic factors, lifestyles, residential characteristics, and MS, we observed a statistically significant association between WBC count and estimated local PM\(_{10}\) levels (p = 0.035). Participants from the least polluted areas (1-year PM\(_{10}\) < 1st quartile cutoff: 27.8 μg/m3) had lower WBC counts than the others (difference = 145 × 10\(^6\)/L; 95% confidence interval, 10–281). We also noted a graded association between PM\(_{10}\) and WBC across subpopulations with increasing MS components, with 91 × 10\(^6\)/L difference in WBC for those with no MS versus 214, 338, and 461 × 10\(^6\)/L for those with 3, 4, and 5 metabolic abnormalities (trend-test p = 0.15). Conclusions: Our study revealed a positive association between long-term PM exposure and hematological markers of inflammation and supported the hypothesized MS-dependent susceptibility.
Published Version: doi:10.1289/ehp.10565
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2367655/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:4892365

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