Temporal Brain Dynamics of Multiple Object Processing: The Flexibility of Individuation

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Temporal Brain Dynamics of Multiple Object Processing: The Flexibility of Individuation

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Title: Temporal Brain Dynamics of Multiple Object Processing: The Flexibility of Individuation
Author: Mazza, Veronica; He, Sheng; Caramazza, Alfonso

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Mazza, Veronica, and Alfonso Caramazza. 2011. Temporal brain dynamics of multiple object processing: the flexibility of individuation. PLoS ONE 6(2).
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Abstract: The ability to process concurrently multiple visual objects is fundamental for a coherent perception of the world. A core component of this ability is the simultaneous individuation of multiple objects. Many studies have addressed the mechanism of object individuation but it remains unknown whether the visual system mandatorily individuates all relevant elements in the visual field, or whether object indexing depends on task demands. We used a neural measure of visual selection, the N2pc component, to evaluate the flexibility of multiple object individuation. In three ERP experiments, participants saw a variable number of target elements among homogenous distracters and performed either an enumeration task (Experiment 1) or a detection task, reporting whether at least one (Experiment 2) or a specified number of target elements (Experiment 3) was present. While in the enumeration task the N2pc response increased as a function of the number of targets, no such modulation was found in Experiment 2, indicating that individuation of multiple targets is not mandatory. However, a modulation of the N2pc similar to the enumeration task was visible in Experiment 3, further highlighting that object individuation is a flexible mechanism that binds indexes to object properties and locations as needed for further object processing.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0017453
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3046149/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:5110740

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7219]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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