Comparative Analysis and Variability of the Jovian X‐Ray Spectra Detected by the Chandra and XMM‐Newton Observatories

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Comparative Analysis and Variability of the Jovian X‐Ray Spectra Detected by the Chandra and XMM‐Newton Observatories

Citable link to this page

. . . . . .

Title: Comparative Analysis and Variability of the Jovian X‐Ray Spectra Detected by the Chandra and XMM‐Newton Observatories
Author: Dalgarno, Alexander; Hui, Yawei; Schultz, David R.; Kharchenko, Vasili A.; Bhardwaj, Anil; Branduardi‐Raymont, Graziella; Stancil, Phillip C.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Lisse, Carey M.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Hui, Yawei, David R. Schultz, Vasili A. Kharchenko, Anil Bhardwaj, Graziella Branduardi-Raymont, Phillip C. Stancil, Thomas E. Cravens, Carey M. Lisse, and Alexander Dalgarno. 2010. Comparative analysis and variability of the Jovian X‐ray spectra detected by the Chandra and XMM‐Newton observatories. Journal of Geophysical Research 115:A07102.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: Expanding upon recent work, a more comprehensive spectral model based on charge exchange induced X‐ray emission by ions precipitating into the Jovian atmosphere is used to provide new understanding of the polar auroras. In conjunction with the Xspec spectral fitting software, the model is applied to analyze observations from both Chandra and XMM‐Newton by systematically varying the initial precipitating ion parameters to obtain the best fit model for the observed spectra. In addition to the oxygen and sulfur ions considered previously, carbon is included to discriminate between solar wind and Jovian magnetospheric ion origins, enabled by the use of extensive databases of both atomic collision cross sections and radiative transitions. On the basis of fits to all the Chandra observations, we find that carbon contributes negligibly to the observed polar X‐ray emission suggesting that the highly accelerated precipitating ions are of magnetospheric origin. Most of the XMM‐Newton fits also favor this conclusion with one exception that implies a possible carbon contribution. Comparison among all the spectra from these two observatories in light of the inferred initial energies and relative abundances of precipitating ions from the modeling show that they are significantly variable in time (observation date) and space (north and south polar X‐ray auroras).
Published Version: doi:10.1029/2009JA014854
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:5128478

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • FAS Scholarly Articles [6885]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters