Collisional Properties of Cold Spin-Polarized Nitrogen Gas: Theory, Experiment, and Prospects as a Sympathetic Coolant for Trapped Atoms and Molecules

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Collisional Properties of Cold Spin-Polarized Nitrogen Gas: Theory, Experiment, and Prospects as a Sympathetic Coolant for Trapped Atoms and Molecules

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Title: Collisional Properties of Cold Spin-Polarized Nitrogen Gas: Theory, Experiment, and Prospects as a Sympathetic Coolant for Trapped Atoms and Molecules
Author: Tscherbul, Timur V.; Dalgarno, Alexander; Klos, Jacek; Zygelman, Bernard; Pavlovic, Zoran; Hummon, Matthew T.; Lu, Hsin-I; Doyle, John M.; Tsikata, Edem

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Citation: Tscherbul, Timur V., Jacek Klos, Alexander Dalgarno, Bernard Zygelman, Zoran Pavlovic, Matthew T. Hummon, Hsin-I Lu, Edem Tsikata, and John M. Doyle. 2010. Collisional properties of cold spin-polarized nitrogen gas: Theory, experiment, and prospects as a sympathetic coolant for trapped atoms and molecules. Physical Review A 82(4): 042718.
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Abstract: We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of collision-induced dipolar relaxation in a cold spin-polarized gas of atomic nitrogen (N). We use buffer gas cooling to create trapped samples of \(^{14}\)N and \(^{15}\)N atoms with densities (5\(\pm\)2) × \(10^{12}\) \(cm^{-3}\) and measure their magnetic relaxation rates at milli-Kelvin temperatures. These measurements, together with rigorous quantum scattering calculations based on accurate \(ab\) \(initio\) interaction potentials for the \(^{7}\Sigma^{+}_{u}\) electronic state of \(N_{2}\) demonstrate that dipolar relaxation in N+N collisions occurs at a slow rate of ~\(10^{-13}\) \(cm^{3}\)/s over a wide range of temperatures (1 mK to 1 K) and magnetic fields (10 mT to 2 T). The calculated dipolar relaxation rates are insensitive to small variations of the interaction potential and to the magnitude of the spin-exchange interaction, enabling the accurate calibration of the measured N atom density. We find consistency between the calculated and experimentally determined rates. Our results suggest that N atoms are promising candidates for future experiments on sympathetic cooling of molecules.
Published Version: doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.82.042718
Other Sources: http://arxiv.org/abs/1007.0469
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:5139187

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [6868]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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