Enhanced Transduction of Colonic Cell Lines In Vitro and the Inflamed Colon in Mice by Viral Vectors, Derived from Adeno-associated Virus Serotype 2, Using Virus-Microbead Conjugates Bearing Lectin

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Enhanced Transduction of Colonic Cell Lines In Vitro and the Inflamed Colon in Mice by Viral Vectors, Derived from Adeno-associated Virus Serotype 2, Using Virus-Microbead Conjugates Bearing Lectin

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Title: Enhanced Transduction of Colonic Cell Lines In Vitro and the Inflamed Colon in Mice by Viral Vectors, Derived from Adeno-associated Virus Serotype 2, Using Virus-Microbead Conjugates Bearing Lectin
Author: Farlow, Samuel J; Sano, Takeshi; Jerusalmi, Alan

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Citation: Farlow, Samuel J., Alan Jerusalmi, and Takeshi Sano. 2007. Enhanced transduction of colonic cell lines in vitro and the inflamed colon in mice by viral vectors, derived from adeno-associated virus serotype 2, using virus-microbead conjugates bearing lectin. BMC Biotechnology 7: 83.
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Abstract: Background: Virus-mediated delivery of therapeutic transgenes to the inflamed colon holds a great potential to serve as an effective therapeutic strategy for inflammatory bowel disease, since local, long-term expression of the encoded therapeutic proteins in the colorectal system is potentially achievable. Viral vectors, derived from adeno-associated virus (AAV), should be very useful for such therapeutic strategies, particularly because they can establish long-term expression of transgenes. However, few studies have been carried out to investigate the ability of AAV-based vectors to transduce the inflamed colon. Results: AAV, derived from adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2), showed a limited ability to transduce colonic cell lines in vitro when used in free form. No appreciable enhancement of the transduction efficiency was seen when AAV2 particles were attached stably to the surfaces of microbeads and delivered to target cells in the form of AAV2-microbead conjugates. However, the transduction efficiency of these colonic cell lines was enhanced substantially when a lectin, concanavalin A (Con A), was co-attached to the microbead surfaces, to which AAV2 particles had been conjugated. This considerable infectivity enhancement of AAV2-microbead conjugates by the co-attachment of Con A may be derived from the fact that Con A binds to α-D-mannosyl moieties that are commonly and abundantly present in cell-surface carbohydrate chains, allowing the conjugates to associate stably with target cells. Intracolonical administration of free AAV2 or AAV2-microbead conjugates without Con A into a mouse colitis model by enema showed very poor transduction of the colonic tissue. In contrast, the delivery of AAV2 in the form of AAV2-microbead conjugates bearing Con A resulted in efficient transduction of the inflamed colon. Conclusion: AAV2-microbead conjugates bearing Con A can serve as efficient gene transfer agents both for poorly permissive colonic cell lines in vitro and for the inflamed colon in a mouse colitis model. This efficient transduction system for the inflamed colon should be useful for the development of gene therapy strategies for inflammatory bowel disease.
Published Version: doi:10.1186/1472-6750-7-83
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2217541/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:5355310

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