Lower Use of Hospice by Cancer Patients who Live in Minority Versus White Areas

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Lower Use of Hospice by Cancer Patients who Live in Minority Versus White Areas

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Title: Lower Use of Hospice by Cancer Patients who Live in Minority Versus White Areas
Author: Earle, Craig C.; Orav, John E.; Brawarsky, Phyllis; Neville, Bridget A.; Haas, Jennifer S.; Acevedo Garcia, Dolores; Williams, David R.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Haas, Jennifer S., Craig C. Earle, John E. Orav, Phyllis Brawarsky, Bridget A. Neville, Dolores Acevedo-Garcia, and David R. Williams. 2007. Lower use of hospice by cancer patients who live in minority versus white areas. Journal of General Internal Medicine 22(3): 396-399.
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Abstract: Background: Although hospice care can alleviate suffering at the end of life for patients with cancer, it remains underutilized, particularly by African Americans and Hispanics. Objective: To examine whether the racial composition of the census tract where an individual resides is associated with hospice use.Design Retrospective analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare file for individuals dying from breast, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer (n = 70,669). Measurements: Hospice use during the 12 months before death. Results: Hospice was most commonly used by individuals who lived in areas with fewer African-American and Hispanic residents (47%), and was least commonly used by individuals who lived in areas with a high percentage of African-American and Hispanic residents (35%). Hispanics (odds ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.29–0.91) and African Americans (0.56, 0.44–0.71) were less likely to use hospice if they lived in a census tract with a high percentage of both African Americans and Hispanics than if they lived in a low minority tract. African Americans and whites were less likely to receive hospice care if they lived in a census tract with a high percentage of Hispanics than if they lived in a low minority area. Conclusions: Increasing hospice use may require interventions to improve the delivery of hospice care in minority communities.
Published Version: doi:10.1007/s11606-006-0034-y
Other Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1824733/pdf/
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Other Posted Material, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#LAA
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:5978733

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