A Quantitative Test of Population Genetics Using Spatio-Genetic Patterns in Bacterial Colonies

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A Quantitative Test of Population Genetics Using Spatio-Genetic Patterns in Bacterial Colonies

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Title: A Quantitative Test of Population Genetics Using Spatio-Genetic Patterns in Bacterial Colonies
Author: Korolev, Kirill; Xavier, Joao; Foster, Kevin; Nelson, David R.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Korolev, Kirill, Joao B. Xavier, David R. Nelson, and Kevin R. Foster. 2011. A quantitative test of population genetics using spatio-genetic patterns in bacterial colonies. The American Naturalist 178(4): 538-552.
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Abstract: It is widely accepted that population genetics theory is the cornerstone of evolutionary analyses. Empirical tests of the theory, however, are challenging because of the complex relationships between space, dispersal, and evolution. Critically, we lack quantitative validation of the spatial models of population genetics. Here we combine analytics, on and off-lattice simulations, and experiments with bacteria to perform quantitative tests of the theory. We study two bacterial species, the gut microbe Escherichia coli and the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and show that spatio-genetic patterns in colony biofilms of both species are accurately described by an extension of the one-dimensional stepping-stone model. We use one empirical measure, genetic diversity at the colony periphery, to parameterize our models and show that we can then accurately predict another key variable: the degree of short-range cell migration along an edge. Moreover, the model allows us to estimate other key parameters including effective population size (density) at the expansion frontier. While our experimental system is a simplification of natural microbial community, we argue it is a proof of principle that the spatial models of population genetics can quantitatively capture organismal evolution.
Published Version: doi:10.1086/661897
Other Sources: http://arxiv.org/abs/1110.5376v1
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:7982715

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7289]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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