Effect of Homocysteine-Lowering Treatment With Folic Acid and B Vitamins on Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women

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Effect of Homocysteine-Lowering Treatment With Folic Acid and B Vitamins on Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women

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dc.contributor.author Van Denburgh, Martin
dc.contributor.author Albert, Christine Marie
dc.contributor.author Song, Yiqing
dc.contributor.author Cook, Nancy Romanowicz
dc.contributor.author Manson, JoAnn Elisabeth
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-21T01:34:22Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.citation Song, Yiqing, Nancy R. Cook, Christine M. Albert, Martin Van Denburgh, and JoAnn E. Manson. 2009. Effect of homocysteine-lowering treatment with folic acid and B vitamins on risk of Type 2 diabetes in women. Diabetes 58(8): 1921-1928. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0012-1797 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8000903
dc.description.abstract OBJECTIVE: Homocysteinemia may play an etiologic role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes by promoting oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. We investigated whether homocysteine-lowering treatment by B vitamin supplementation prevents the risk of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The Women's Antioxidant and Folic Acid Cardiovascular Study (WAFACS), a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 5,442 female health professionals aged ≥40 years with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) or three or more CVD risk factors, included 4,252 women free of diabetes at baseline. Participants were randomly assigned to either an active treatment group (daily intake of a combination pill of 2.5 mg folic acid, 50 mg vitamin B6, and 1 mg vitamin B12) or to the placebo group. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 7.3 years, 504 women had an incident diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Overall, there was no significant difference between the active treatment group and the placebo group in diabetes risk (relative risk 0.94 [95% CI 0.79–1.11]; P = 0.46), despite significant lowering of homocysteine levels. Also, there was no evidence for effect modifications by baseline intakes of dietary folate, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. In a sensitivity analysis, the null result remained for women compliant with their study pills (0.92 [0.76–1.10]; P = 0.36). CONCLUSIONS: Lowering homocysteine levels by daily supplementation with folic acid and vitamins B6 and B12 did not reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes among women at high risk for CVD. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher American Diabetes Association en_US
dc.relation.isversionof doi://10.2337/db09-0087 en_US
dc.relation.hasversion http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2712772/pdf/ en_US
dash.license LAA
dc.subject pharmacology and therapeutics en_US
dc.title Effect of Homocysteine-Lowering Treatment With Folic Acid and B Vitamins on Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Women en_US
dc.type Journal Article en_US
dc.description.version Version of Record en_US
dc.relation.journal Diabetes en_US
dash.depositing.author Song, Yiqing
dc.date.available 2012-01-21T01:34:22Z
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospital en_US
dash.affiliation.other SPH^Epidemiology en_US
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospital en_US
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospital en_US
dash.affiliation.other SPH^Epidemiology en_US
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Medicine-Brigham and Women's Hospital en_US

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