Obesity Prevention in Child Care: A Review of U.S. State Regulations

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Obesity Prevention in Child Care: A Review of U.S. State Regulations

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dc.contributor.author Benjamin, Sara E
dc.contributor.author Slining, Meghan
dc.contributor.author Walker, Elizabeth M.
dc.contributor.author Cradock, Angie Lynn
dc.contributor.author Gillman, Matthew William
dc.date.accessioned 2012-02-12T01:36:38Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Benjamin, Sara E., Angie Cradock, Elizabeth M. Walker, Meghan Slining, and Matthew W. Gillman. 2008. Obesity prevention in child care: A review of U.S. state regulations. BMC Public Health 8: 188. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1471-2458 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8156560
dc.description.abstract Objective: To describe and contrast individual state nutrition and physical activity regulations related to childhood obesity for child care centers and family child care homes in the United States. Methods: We conducted a review of regulations for child care facilities for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. We examined state regulations and recorded key nutrition and physical activity items that may contribute to childhood obesity. Items included in this review were: 1) Water is freely available; 2) Sugar-sweetened beverages are limited; 3) Foods of low nutritional value are limited; 4) Children are not forced to eat; 5) Food is not used as a reward; 6) Support is provided for breastfeeding and provision of breast milk; 7) Screen time is limited; and 8) Physical activity is required daily. Results: Considerable variation exists among state nutrition and physical activity regulations related to obesity. Tennessee had six of the eight regulations for child care centers, and Delaware, Georgia, Indiana, and Nevada had five of the eight regulations. Conversely, the District of Columbia, Idaho, Nebraska and Washington had none of the eight regulations. For family child care homes, Georgia and Nevada had five of the eight regulations; Arizona, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oregon, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, and West Virginia had four of the eight regulations. California, the District of Columbia, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska did not have any of the regulations related to obesity for family child care homes. Conclusion: Many states lack specific nutrition and physical activity regulations related to childhood obesity for child care facilities. If widely implemented, enhancing state regulations could help address the obesity epidemic in young children in the United States. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_US
dc.relation.isversionof doi:10.1186/1471-2458-8-188 en_US
dc.relation.hasversion http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2438347/pdf/ en_US
dash.license LAA
dc.title Obesity Prevention in Child Care: A Review of U.S. State Regulations en_US
dc.type Journal Article en_US
dc.description.version Version of Record en_US
dc.relation.journal BMC Public Health en_US
dash.depositing.author Gillman, Matthew William
dc.date.available 2012-02-12T01:36:38Z
dash.affiliation.other SPH^Society Human Development and Health en_US
dash.affiliation.other HMS^Population Medicine en_US
dash.affiliation.other SPH^Nutrition en_US

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