Shamanism in Northern and Southern Eurasia: Their Distinctive Methods of Change of Consciousness

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Shamanism in Northern and Southern Eurasia: Their Distinctive Methods of Change of Consciousness

Citable link to this page

. . . . . .

Title: Shamanism in Northern and Southern Eurasia: Their Distinctive Methods of Change of Consciousness
Author: Witzel, Michael E. J.
Citation: Witzel, Michael E. J. 2011. Shamanism in northern and southern Eurasia: Their distinctive methods of change of consciousness. Social Science Information 50(1): 39-61.
Full Text & Related Files:
Abstract: This article seeks to establish that the ‘southern’ shamanism of the San, Andamanese and Australian Aboriginals differs substantially from the well-known ‘classical’ Siberian version found in various forms in large parts of Eurasia and the Americas (‘Laurasia’). The typical southern (‘Gondwana’) shamanistic features of heat rising up the spine are linked to medieval Indian Kundalini yoga and some representations in Paleolithic art. This process is an important aspect of the change of consciousness initiated by shamanistic initiation and practice.
Published Version: doi:10.1177/0539018410391044
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8456537

Show full Dublin Core record

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7078]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters