Kin Selection and the Evolution of Social Information Use in Animal Conflict

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Kin Selection and the Evolution of Social Information Use in Animal Conflict

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Title: Kin Selection and the Evolution of Social Information Use in Animal Conflict
Author: Rankin, Daniel J.; Dall, Sasha R. X.; Baker, Christopher Cher Meng

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Citation: Baker, Christopher C. M., Sasha R. X. Dall, and Daniel J. Rankin. 2012. Kin selection and the evolution of social information use in animal conflict. PLoS ONE 7(2): e31664.
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Abstract: Animals often use social information about conspecifics in making decisions about cooperation and conflict. While the importance of kin selection in the evolution of intraspecific cooperation and conflict is widely acknowledged, few studies have examined how relatedness influences the evolution of social information use. Here we specifically examine how relatedness affects the evolution of a stylised form of social information use known as eavesdropping. Eavesdropping involves individuals escalating conflicts with rivals observed to have lost their last encounter and avoiding fights with those seen to have won. We use a game theoretical model to examine how relatedness affects the evolution of eavesdropping, both when strategies are discrete and when they are continuous or mixed. We show that relatedness influences the evolution of eavesdropping, such that information use peaks at intermediate relatedness. Our study highlights the importance of considering kin selection when exploring the evolution of complex forms of information use.
Published Version: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0031664
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8581102

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [6466]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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