Quarantine: Legal Reform for 21st Century Crises

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Quarantine: Legal Reform for 21st Century Crises

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dc.contributor.advisor Peter Hutt en_US
dc.contributor.author Pennell, Joseph
dc.date.accessioned 2012-04-18T13:42:00Z
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.citation Joseph Pennell, Quarantine: Legal Reform for 21st Century Crises (May 2008). en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8592047
dc.description.abstract Legal authority for quarantine predates the American Revolution, and was implicitly authorized by the Constitution. State and federal quarantine law remained static during the latter half of the 20th century despite expansive interpretations of procedural due process rights. After the events of September 11, 2001 and the subsequent anthrax murders, lawmakers and academics began developing new laws and regulations to address threats such as bioterrorism and pandemic disease. The sweeping powers of these new laws and regulations faced harsh criticism from civil libertarians. This paper discusses legal authority for quarantine up through the early 20th century, the 20th century Supreme Court jurisprudence limiting future quarantine powers, the post-9/11 attempts to reform state and federal quarantine law, and the criticism those attempts have faced. en_US
dash.license LAA
dc.subject Food and Drug Law en_US
dc.subject General background-Related federal statutes and agencies en_US
dc.subject.other Food and Drug Law en_US
dc.title Quarantine: Legal Reform for 21st Century Crises en_US
dc.type Paper (for course/seminar/workshop) en_US
dc.relation.journal Food and Drug Law: An Electronic Book of Student Papers en_US
dc.date.available 2012-04-18T13:42:00Z

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