Dynamics of the Gender Gap for Young Professionals in the Financial and Corporate Sectors

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Dynamics of the Gender Gap for Young Professionals in the Financial and Corporate Sectors

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Title: Dynamics of the Gender Gap for Young Professionals in the Financial and Corporate Sectors
Author: Goldin, Claudia D.; Bertrand, Marianne; Katz, Lawrence F.

Note: Order does not necessarily reflect citation order of authors.

Citation: Bertrand, Marianne, Claudia Goldin, and Lawrence F. Katz. 2010. Dynamics of the gender gap for young professionals in the financial and corporate sectors. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 2(3): 228-255.
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Abstract: The careers of MBAs from a top US business school are studied to understand how career dynamics differ by gender. Although male and female MBAs have nearly identical earnings at the outset of their careers, their earnings soon diverge, with the male earnings advantage reaching almost 60 log points a decade after MBA completion. Three proximate factors account for the large and rising gender gap in earnings: differences in training prior to MBA graduation, differences in career interruptions, and differences in weekly hours. The greater career discontinuity and shorter work hours for female MBAs are largely associated with motherhood. (JEL J16, J22, J31, J44)
Published Version: doi:10.1257/app.2.3.228
Other Sources: http://www.nber.org/papers/w14681
Terms of Use: This article is made available under the terms and conditions applicable to Open Access Policy Articles, as set forth at http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:dash.current.terms-of-use#OAP
Citable link to this page: http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8810041

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  • FAS Scholarly Articles [7470]
    Peer reviewed scholarly articles from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences of Harvard University
 
 

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