Development and Efficacy of HACCP in the Fish Industry

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Development and Efficacy of HACCP in the Fish Industry

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Peter Hutt en_US
dc.contributor.author VanDerkruik, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned 2012-06-03T10:35:18Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation Rachel VanDerkruik, Development and Efficacy of HACCP in the Fish Industry (April 2010). en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3:HUL.InstRepos:8822181
dc.description.abstract HACCP is a science-based system of preventive controls for food safety that commercial seafood processors develop to identify potential food safety hazards and implement to keep them from occurring. The FDA Seafood HACCP program was designed to increase the margin of safety that consumers already had and to reduce those illnesses that do occur to the lowest possible levels. This paper will describe the development of HACCP within the Seafood Industry and provide a brief overview of what is involved with this system. The implications of the complexity of the fish industry will be discussed in comparison with the meat and poultry industry, which is under a different HACCP program dictated by the USDA. The impact of HACCP on international trade has varied among countries, with developing countries requiring some external support for implementation. Several criticisms and compliments of the seafood HACCP program will be discussed, along with a look at the direction of this program in the near future. en_US
dash.license LAA
dc.subject.other Food and Drug Law en_US
dc.title Development and Efficacy of HACCP in the Fish Industry en_US
dc.type Paper (for course/seminar/workshop) en_US
dc.date.available 2012-06-03T10:35:18Z

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
VanDerkruik, Rachel.pdf 249.0Kb PDF View/Open

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

 
 

Search DASH


Advanced Search
 
 

Submitters